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Old 11-12-2015, 05:30 PM
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AdmiralBuck AdmiralBuck is offline
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Default Re: 1:350 TOS Light Cruiser

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCI-FI View Post
*literally* laughed out loud at the 2001 astronauts looking at the "toppled monolith"...

Ok, Adventures in Armatures questions:
1) What type of solder are you using?
2) How do you know the armature (+solder) is strong enough to hold the resin weight of Sentinel (with enough margin of error to survive handling)?
3) Is the armature going to be cast inside the resin? Or will the resin be "hollow enough" to fit the armature inside? (This is a similar problem I'm pre-pondering for my DonS Reliant project. - The Cat recommends an internal structure for that, so I'm learning all I can...)
4) Electra? What's 2552, etc? Do you have a list for the whole class...?
Thanks SCI-FI for following this thread - and so diligently! Most guys would have faded away by now

1) Solder! (Everyone asks me this) I am barely aware there are options here. Rosin core? No? Maybe? I have about 5 rolls of the stuff from various projects, mostly plumbing related. I use whatever you buy at Lowes, the Lead Free kind.

2) This frame is very rigid since I doubled the profile. The 537 ships used a single profile "keel" of 1/4 square tube. This structure is more than adequate to support the weight of the model and that's not even an issue as the hull pieces themselves form a unibody when finished. The model itself will not weigh more than a few pounds since it will be hollow. The resin is very lightweight. The goal of the frame is mainly to act as a guide in aligning the components as it goes together. As a complete scratch build, the engineering and part assembly is made up as we go. Having a keel to build up from keeps everything square and to the 'plans' as well as a convenient mounting column for construction and display. The biggest advantage of an internal framework is the alignment and support of the warp pylons and nacelles. On most Trek starships, this feature is a tenuous sagging issue and especially on a model this large.

My plan is to have detachable warp drives (for transportation). These will have round brass telescoping tubes with corresponding mates in the pylons for alignment as well as magnets to hold them. The wiring to the inner warp electronics will use an RC-type quick disconnect plug.

3) The armature will not be cast inside the hull. The outer hull pieces will all be thin skinned and basically 'hung' to the framework through the use of styrene braces.

4) You have such eagle eyes! (same with the bench scans) Yes, there is a ship listing of the Sentinel Class. I was trying out the Electra name on the hull when I produced the frame layout. Here's the current listing:

Sentinel Class:
NCC-2550 Sentinel
NCC-2551 Defender
NCC-2552 Guardian
NCC-2553 Ionian
NCC-2554 Adriatic
NCC-2555 Swift
NCC-2556 Europa
NCC-2557 Proteus
NCC-2558 Pegasus
NCC-2559 Vigilant
NCC-2560 Vanguard
NCC-2561 Electra

There probably isn't a detail I have not thought of about my ship. Hell, I could tell you what color the pillow cases are on the port side crew cabins on E deck. It's been an obsession for the last few months. I apologize in advance.

Last edited by AdmiralBuck; 11-12-2015 at 06:00 PM.
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