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  #16  
Old 07-12-2013, 08:19 PM
Mark Yungblut Mark Yungblut is offline
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Default Re: The Joker

You read it right… Silly Putty used as a masking media. When I first heard about it I thought it was nuts. But after watching some videos on it I bought into the idea. I already had a pasta style roller that I use for polymer clay. The guys at Garage kits US, who told me about rolling it out with a pasta/ polymer roller at Wonderfest this year, got me interested so I bought a bulk block of silly putty from Crayola.


I tested some of the purple on the jacket and with the orange overspray I wanted to put a good base coat of white primer on the jacket before going at it with purple.



I took a small amount of the putty and put it in the roller and rolled it out. Because it is silicone I did not worry about it sticking to the steel rollers.







The pasta roller allows me to get the silly putty SO thing I can nearly read through it once rolled out.



As you can see from this image, the putty really conforms to the sculpt.



I then take a newly sharp scalpel blade and trimmed the putty back.



Using silicone sculpting tools I pushed the Putty as close to the edge as I could. I made the choice to have it overlap the inside of the coat just a bit since the detailing between the vest and the jacket will be hand painted.





Here is the torso ready to hit with white primer.



Then I sprayed the piece with the white primer.




Once the primer was given 10 minutes to sit I removed the putty.




Here’s a shot of the silicone sculpting tools I used to work the putty. I got these from The Complete Sculptor.

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  #17  
Old 07-13-2013, 04:30 AM
Lord Darth Beavis Lord Darth Beavis is offline
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Default Re: The Joker

Amazing work, Mark. Looking forward to your next installment, next week!
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  #18  
Old 07-13-2013, 01:25 PM
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Default Re: The Joker

This has to be the best tutorial I've seen.Totally blown away!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  #19  
Old 07-13-2013, 02:29 PM
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Default Re: The Joker

Damn! Ridiculous! Amazing work.
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  #20  
Old 07-14-2013, 10:23 AM
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Default Re: The Joker

Very nice. Its great to see a Artist/technician at work!!
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  #21  
Old 07-15-2013, 10:39 AM
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Default Re: The Joker

Mark-

How do you like silly putty compared to Liquid Latex for masking?
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  #22  
Old 07-15-2013, 12:06 PM
Mark Yungblut Mark Yungblut is offline
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Default Re: The Joker

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisMac View Post
Mark-

How do you like silly putty compared to Liquid Latex for masking?
Well so far I find the silly putty to be stupid easy (once you get used to handling it) to use and you don't need to wait for any drying. In my research I have read where many of the figure guys that use SP also use liquid making. As of yet I have not needed to use them together.

I plan to show a different way to apply it when I paint the purple, so stay tuned.

BTW thanks for the compliments gents!
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  #23  
Old 07-19-2013, 08:40 AM
Mark Yungblut Mark Yungblut is offline
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Default Re: The Joker

Sorry for the delay in posting. We had a nice mini vaca relaxing on Lake Cumberland. I also took a few days to load some ammo for some range time this coming weekend.

So let’s talk painting with oils… It’s REALLY not as scary as you might think. The primary thing to keep in mind is that you need to work in thin and I mean THIN layers over a base color that can act as your mid tone color.

One of the things to remember about painting with oils is to parcel them out on a piece of cardboard to allow the linseed oil to be wicked away and thus giving you a slightly thicker and more opaque color. This is particularly important with colors that run thin like yellows, deep reds and purple. For this example I’ll be painting the gloves for the Joker. My goal is to paint them a very light purple much like The Killing Joke graphic novel.

To start I placed coin sized amounts of oil paint on a piece of corrugated cardboard. The colors I am using are Dioxazine Purple, Cobalt Violet Hue, Zinc White and Lamp Black. Just as a note, I used Zinc White since it is the most translucent white out of the tube. Titanium white tends to be much more opaque and would give a much harsher transition for highlight colors.




After parsing out the colors I let them sit for an hour while I made dinner. As you can see a good deal of oil was wicked away into the cardboard.





The base color was painted with Citadel Genestealer Purple acrylic. I mixed a base that was very close by adding the Cobalt purple Hue to the Zinc White until it matched. This was then thinly brushed on both sets of gloves…








Using a Winsor and Newton Series 7 000 brush I applied the Dioxazine purple to the shadow area VERY lightly and with frequent wiping off of the brush.











I then take a small flat brush and use it to blend the darker color into the base.














Highlights are the next two part step for this part. First I mix the base color with the white to get a color that is 50-60% lighter as the first highlight.





I then took a brush and added tiny dots to the glove where the highlights need to start.








These dots and fine lines are blended with a small flat brush.



Here some of the highlight has been blended in to provide contrast as opposed to light or shading.





Finally, the pure zinc white is added to the tips of the fingers and the highest spots on the palm of the glove.








Here is the glove nearly finished. I will likely go back and add some translucent photo oils to the deep shadows once the oils have completely set.





This shot is to show that it is important to keep wiping the brush. DO NOT clean it with solvents while you are painting as the solvent will leak out of the ferrule of the brush and onto your work. You are better off using more than one brush to blend one for light colors and one for darks.





After a couple of hours you can see how much oil was wicked away by the cardboard. Even loosing that much oil it will not affect the binding of the pigments within the paint.





When I was done I put the “palette” in a sealable container to slow the drying, so I can use the colors on the other hand in the next painting session.


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  #24  
Old 07-19-2013, 06:54 PM
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Default Re: The Joker

I gotta say- this is just a terrific thread!
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  #25  
Old 08-01-2013, 12:45 PM
Mark Yungblut Mark Yungblut is offline
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Default Re: The Joker

Hey folks sorry for the long delay in posting. My daughter was with me for summertime visitation so I spent some family time.

I have gotten a fair amount of work done on the Joker. Next step was to paint the purple tux jacket. I started by applying the Silly Putty to the vest area again.









I mixed up a large amount of the base purple so I had enough for base coat, light and shadow colors. All of the purple paint is Games Workshop Citadel acrylic colors.



I applied the base coat to the jacket.





Highlight and Shading were added to the jacket. It is difficult to see but it is there.





Once I got the basic airbrushing done I decided to tack the figure together to see how all the colors work together.



While I had it tacked together I gave it a good coat of Humbrol matt clear coat.



Once tacked together I realized that the jacket was too light. So I decided to go back and repaint it darker.




Using one of my highly polished sculpting tools I reapplied the Silly Putty.





The Jacket was repainted a darker shade of purple.





I then removed the Silly putty and got busy applying pastels to the jacket to give further highlights that are nice and subtle.









I applied the ground up pastel with a q-tip to the smaller details.





I then fixed the pastels down with light mists of Testorís Dullcote. I went back an reapplied more pastel after everything was set (more on that later).
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  #26  
Old 08-01-2013, 12:47 PM
Mark Yungblut Mark Yungblut is offline
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Default Re: The Joker

Okay letís address oil washes and dry brushing with oils to bring out details. While the Jacket cured, I decided to finish the hair on the Jokerís head. The first thing I wanted to do was give the hair a good wash of oils using distilled turps and Permanent Green Deep. This is a good color for that as it tends to be fairly transparent. So I mixed up a relatively intense wash to apply to the base green of the hair. This serves several purposes. First it darkens the hair, second it changes the hue from a more olive color to a truer dark green. Lastly the wash will settle in all of the recessed areas and add shading and depth.

I mixed up the wash in an old medicine bottle cap. I then mixed it up with an older flat brush that I reserve to mix non-metallic colors. I say that because I segregate my brushes based on whether they have been used for metallic or non-metallic paints. There is nothing worse than painting a non-metallic paint when some metallic color seeps out of the brush ferrule and either goes into the paint as you mix it OR worse on the model itself.




You can see that the wash is pretty intense.




This picture shows what the wash does to the original olive drab green that I painted as a base.




It is easy to see how the wash settled in the recessed details.










For the first highlight color I mixed some Permanent Green Hue with the Permanent green Deep to get a middle tone.




The turpentine in the wash is dry but the color is not yet set. This will allow some blending to happen when the highlight is dry brushed onto the raised details.




I started to apply the color as you would a dry brush color, slowly adding it to the hair being careful to keep the pigment on the raised areas whenever possible.



















Here is a view of my work area note that I keep a piece of paper towel handy to remove the vast majority of the paint from the brush.




I allowed the work to sit overnight. I then went back and added spot amounts of the wash to the deep recessed areas.




I then mixed up two highlight colors using Permanent Green light and Lemon Yellow Hue and Permanent Green light and Naples Yellow Light. Not adding ANY white to either color. White would dull the saturation of the color significantly.




I took a clean flat brush and gathered some of the Green with Naples Yellow as this will be the main highlight color.




Most of the paint was removed from the brush.




This color was applied judiciously to the highest raised areas of the hair and the areas that would logically show a highlight.







The Green and Lemon yellow was then applied to just a few areas to give intensity and shape to the hair.







The final step was to take a dry, flat brush and blend the colors which also removed some of the color.




Here it is possible to see how much still came off the piece even though the dry brush had most of the paint removed.




Here are the results of the work.







I want to take a little bit of time and talk about good brush maintenance. When you pay up to $20.00 for a really good Winsor and Newton Series 7 or Raphael Kolinsky Brush Sable brush it is well worth the time to properly clean the brush and to maintain it as well. Remember these types of brushes are made from real hairs so they are as susceptible to damage just like your own hair. I use ďThe MastersĒ Brush Cleaner and Preserver. In fact I have had this jar for close to 15 years. So it goes a LONG way.




Here is my mixing brush. As you can see itís a mess even after cleaning it with solvent.




I add water to the tub and then start working the brush in the cleaner.




It is amazing how much pigment is still left in the brush after cleaning.




Once all the brushes are cleaned and rinsed there is still pigment left in the tub. I wipe this out with a clean paper towel and then rewet the tub.




The last thing I do is take a little of the cleaner preserver and apply it to the brush and them shape them. This is allowed to stay in the brush which acts as a moisturizer to the hair. I will wipe the brushes when I go to use them again.




Thanks for following this lengthy post!

Cheers,
Mark
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  #27  
Old 08-01-2013, 06:33 PM
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Default Re: The Joker

Mark-

When you apply the pastels, are you using a foam brush rather then a traditional hair brush? I've always used hair brushes but you seem to get pretty good results with the foam.

I gotta say, I have an original Moonsinger kit that I have been waiting to skill up my oil and pastel techniques before I start. This thread is really helping. I was never happy with my highlights but I think I got it after seeing the way you did the vest, glove and hair.

Thanks man.
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  #28  
Old 08-01-2013, 07:49 PM
Mark Yungblut Mark Yungblut is offline
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Default Re: The Joker

I used a combination of a foam applicator and q-tips to apply the pastels.

The important thing about painting oil washes over an enamel base is to give the enamel a minimum of two to 4 days to completely cure. Otherwise the turps will eat at the base too quickly and you won't get the layering/ tinting effect.
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  #29  
Old 08-02-2013, 08:51 AM
Mark Yungblut Mark Yungblut is offline
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Default Re: The Joker

I think one of the hardest thing to get used to with oils is less is more. Most folks want to naturally paint with a loaded brush, as you would do when applying a base coat. With oils that is a one way ticket to gloppy looking paint.
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  #30  
Old 08-18-2013, 07:13 PM
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Default Re: The Joker

Wow! That's some colors! Great work Mark.
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